The Trickster, the Drag Queen, and the Goddess: Exploring Gender and Sexuality through an Archetypal Lens

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Dec 14, 2016 2:31:11 PM

A guest post by Bonnie Bright, Ph.D.

Aaron Mason, M.A., is a freelance medical writer with an infectious laugh, whose love of depth psychology led him to make sweeping changes in his life since deciding to earn his Master’s degree in the Engaged Humanities Program at Pacifica Graduate Institute. On his desk in his West Hollywood apartment sits a Pez dispenser gifted to him by a close friend. The figure is a coyote, and Aaron has constructed a wig for it using multi-colored ribbons, and grounded its feet in magenta clay. He attached the coyote to his dashboard when he drove across the country from Jersey City in a dramatic move to the west coast. Aaron has dubbed this icon “Coyote Drag Queen,” a name that takes on layers of meaning when one has a chance to hear Aaron’s personal story.

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Posted in: archetypes, gender, goddesses

Narcissistic Tendencies: Donald Trump and Shakespeare's Macbeth

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Sep 14, 2016 3:53:51 PM

A new book A Clear and Present Danger: Narcissism in the Era of Donald Trump has just been released by Chrion Publications. The book features twenty articles on the subject of narcissism, written by esteemed professors and professionals of psychology and depth psychology. I recently caught up with Dr. Susan Rowland, chair of Pacifica's M.A. Engaged Humanities and the Creative Life Program who wrote "The Demonic and Narcissistic Power of the Media in Shakespeare's Macbeth" for the section of the book titled Archetypal Narcissism. Here is our dialogue about the book:

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Posted in: Current Affairs, archetypes, Pacifica News, literature

Archetypal Reflections: Dr. Keiron Le Grice on Jungian and Depth Psychologies

Posted by Erik Davis on Jul 22, 2016 9:12:17 AM

A guest post by Bonnie Bright, Ph.D.

C.G. Jung contended that our personalities are made up of a multitude of archetypes, Dr. Keiron Le Grice, Chair of the Jungian and Archetypal Studies program at Pacifica Graduate Institute, reminded me when he recently sat down with me to share his insights into the field of depth psychology. Each archetype asserts its own aims, moods, and ideas on our personalities, influencing our lives on a day-to-day basis. Jungian and depth psychologies, by aiming to make what is unconscious conscious, offer an entrance point into recognizing and understanding the various deep forces that move through us from one day to the next, engendering a deep comprehension of the psyche and the motivations, instincts, and impulses that are at work in our lives.

Individuation, a term coined by Jung, is a way that we can come to terms with this multiplicity of forces, and to attune to a greater organizing force, perhaps looked at as “the god within.” An archetypal view can enable us to find deep meaning in life, Keiron notes. We live in a time when we no longer have a religious, spiritual, or mythological framework to provide orientation in our lives. To be able to turn within, through the study of dreams and synchronicities that occur to us, through direct engagement with the unconscious and through spiritual experiences, we can begin to find our own personal sense of meaning. When we encounter the numinous, (a term coined by Rudolf Otto and adopted by Jung), that tremendous and fascinating mystery that underlies our experience can ground us in our own spiritual and moral autonomies. We need to each find our own individual myth at a time when the collective myths are rendered invalid by the dominant scientific rational perspective in the western worldview.

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Posted in: archetypes, C.G. Jung

The Return of the Goddesses-in Mysteries!

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Nov 13, 2015 11:14:57 AM

Notes on a Depth Discussion between Susan Rowland and Bonnie Bright

If you are an avid reader, the mystery genre is likely a familiar presence in the pleasures of your pastime. Those who love detective fiction really love it, as author and scholar Susan Rowland insists to me in a recent interview, and there is a strong ritual element in the reading and writing of mysteries. There are certain consistencies in every story that one may begin to expect; and yet they continue to enthrall us even as they unfold. Mystery novels hold a place for ritual in our culture, and a sense of wanting to repeat something we already know about, things we expect each time we pick one up.

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Posted in: archetypes, C.G. Jung, goddesses, literature

What Archetype are you when it comes to Managing Money?

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Nov 10, 2015 3:55:10 PM

A guest post by Dr. Jennifer Leigh Selig. Dr. Selig was recently featured in the New York Times article Financial Advice for Women, From Women. Dr. Selig provided the research and methodology to produce the new archetypal indicator according to how we manage our money.

What does a geeky academic do on her three month sabbatical? More geeky academic things, it seems! At least, this is what happened to me on my sabbatical this summer, which landed me square on the front page of the New York Times Business section on Saturday, November 7th.

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Posted in: archetypes, Psychology, money

Sleuth and the Goddess: Hestia, Artemis, Athena, And Aphrodite in Women's Detective Fiction

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Jul 5, 2015 8:33:00 AM

Goddesses live in detective fiction by women in ways little noticed before The Sleuth and the Goddess; in particular, how Hestia, Artemis, Athena and Aphrodite breathe into and shape woman-authored mysteries, whether driving a hardboiled P.I., such as Sara Paretsky’s V.I. Warshawski, or haunting domestic oriented sleuth Hannah Swensen, composed by Joanne Fluke. Goddesses are structures of consciousness and being, archetypes divining various forms of art rooted in the soul. Although these archetypes defy gender boundaries (so that male gods creep into women’s writing, just as goddesses are seduced or pursued by, or summon a male author), these four goddesses: Hestia of home and hearth, Artemis of hunting, Athena of communal survival, and Aphrodite of wily desire, most deeply incarnate aspects of the sacred in women’s mysteries. Just as subgenres of women’s writing such as the detective “cozy” have not yet received their due of critical attention, so too the goddesses are demanding that more attention be paid to the feminine psyche. The Sleuth and the Goddess shows us that to read the works by renowned authors such as Marcia Muller, Sue Grafton, Diane Mott Davidson, Jacqueline Winspear, Lindsey Davis, and many more, is to summon the goddesses and be blessed by their vision, beauty, and call to danger.

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Posted in: archetypes, gender, goddesses

POUND YOUR CHEST, EVERYONE – PART II; Creator Archetype

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Dec 8, 2014 3:21:00 PM

A guest post by Dr. Jennifer Selig

Deborah Quibell is many things, but she is archetypally a Creator. At least that’s how I know her. I met her several years back when she entered into the newly launched Jungian and Archetypal Studies program at Pacifica. I am now her dissertation chair, which is a distinct pleasure because part of how Deborah creates is through writing. She’s good. She’s damn good.

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Posted in: Current Affairs, archetypes

POUND YOUR CHEST, EVERYONE – PART I

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Dec 8, 2014 3:18:00 PM

A guest post by Dr. Jennifer Selig

One of the greatest joys of teaching at Pacifica is working with an amazing student body. Our students awe and amaze us. They challenge and create us. They push and pull us. They keep us awake at night and awaken us in the morning and call us forward during the day to be the best that we can be because they are striving to be their best selves and thinking we might have something, just a little something, to offer those selves.

And sometimes, they supersede us.

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Posted in: Current Affairs, archetypes

On the Horizon: Upcoming Events at Pacifica

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Dec 1, 2014 4:52:00 PM

At a glance:
  • December 16- The Community Psychology, Liberation Psychology, and Ecopsychology fieldwork presentations
  • January 16-18- Pacifica's Alumni Association Annual Meeting
  • January 21-24- Dream Tending 2015 Certificate Program
  • January 25- Earth Charter Meeting
  • January 28- Book signing and reception
  • January 29- Shakespeare in Depth: A Four-Week Online and Weekend Residential Workshop with Susan Rowland
  • February 7- The Pacifica Experience
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Posted in: Alumni, archetypes, Pacifica Events