Depth Psychology: Empowering Multicultural Women in the Wider World

Posted by Krystyna Knight on Apr 5, 2018 9:18:33 AM

Depth Psychology: Empowering Multicultural Women in the Wider World-An Interview with Self-Made Media Mogul, Nely Galán, MFT.  A Guest Post by Bonnie Bright, Ph.D.

Listen to the full audio interview with Nely Galán here (approx. 32 mins)

We’ve all heard the adage that success doesn’t always bring happiness, a concept Nely Galán knows well. As a Latina and a self-made media mogul who has produced hundreds of television shows, headed a TV network, and generated a significant amount of income, she felt an odd sense of relief when the economy crashed in 2008, bringing many of her projects to a halt. She realized the extent to which she felt like a hamster running around a wheel, and while she would never have tried to exit the industry if she had maintained her level of involvement in multiple projects, the economic downturn provided her a way out.

 

By that point in her life, she had been through psychotherapy and understood, from a personal perspective, how powerful it could be. Acknowledging that she had always wanted to go to school to study psychology, she took the plunge; first finishing a B.A., before applying to Pacifica, which had already been in her “mind and heart for a while,” as she reveals.

 

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Posted in: Alumni, clinical psychology, gender, leadership, vocation, depth psychology, individuation, Pacifica Students

On Feminist Roots and Radical Edges of Depth Psychology at Pacifica: In Celebration of Women’s History Month

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Apr 10, 2017 3:57:55 PM

A guest post by Dr. Oksana Yakushko, Ph.D.

For many women and men, the discovery of feminism as a personal and spiritual standpoint, may have come as much from reaction to politics of gender (e.g., reproductive rights, equal pay) as from being exposed to the work of scholars. Pacifica enjoys the work of a number of scholars who invite us to redress societal misogyny and to craft psychological theory and practice that supports the full equality of women. Marija Gimbutas' work, carefully preserved in the OPUS Archive and Research Center at Pacifica, galvanized many women toward a recognition that patriarchy is neither universal nor even that historically dominant (non-patriarchal cultures existed for far far lengthier swaths of time than current patriarchal ones). Her discoveries of the Goddess civilizations, her insistence on privileging the women-centering archeological interpretations of these findings, and her focus on visual documentation of overwhelming evidence of non-patriarchal traditions stirred everything and everyone feminist for generations.

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Posted in: gender, depth psychology

The Trickster, the Drag Queen, and the Goddess: Exploring Gender and Sexuality through an Archetypal Lens

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Dec 14, 2016 2:31:11 PM

A guest post by Bonnie Bright, Ph.D.

Aaron Mason, M.A., is a freelance medical writer with an infectious laugh, whose love of depth psychology led him to make sweeping changes in his life since deciding to earn his Master’s degree in the Engaged Humanities Program at Pacifica Graduate Institute. On his desk in his West Hollywood apartment sits a Pez dispenser gifted to him by a close friend. The figure is a coyote, and Aaron has constructed a wig for it using multi-colored ribbons, and grounded its feet in magenta clay. He attached the coyote to his dashboard when he drove across the country from Jersey City in a dramatic move to the west coast. Aaron has dubbed this icon “Coyote Drag Queen,” a name that takes on layers of meaning when one has a chance to hear Aaron’s personal story.

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Posted in: archetypes, gender, goddesses

Encountering Sabina Spielrein: Forging Paths To and Through Powerful Women in Depth Psychology

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Aug 29, 2016 12:49:16 PM

In 2011, Sabina Spielrein became something of a household name due to the debut of a mainstream film called A Dangerous Method, starring well-known actors including Michael Fassbender, Keira Knightley, and Viggo Mortensen. The film purported to tell the story of Sabina Spielrein, a young woman psychiatric patient and acquaintance of the infamous doctors Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud, pioneers of the modern psychoanalytical and depth psychology movements.

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Posted in: C.G. Jung, history of psychology, Psychology, gender, depth psychology

Sleuth and the Goddess: Hestia, Artemis, Athena, And Aphrodite in Women's Detective Fiction

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Jul 5, 2015 8:33:00 AM

Goddesses live in detective fiction by women in ways little noticed before The Sleuth and the Goddess; in particular, how Hestia, Artemis, Athena and Aphrodite breathe into and shape woman-authored mysteries, whether driving a hardboiled P.I., such as Sara Paretsky’s V.I. Warshawski, or haunting domestic oriented sleuth Hannah Swensen, composed by Joanne Fluke. Goddesses are structures of consciousness and being, archetypes divining various forms of art rooted in the soul. Although these archetypes defy gender boundaries (so that male gods creep into women’s writing, just as goddesses are seduced or pursued by, or summon a male author), these four goddesses: Hestia of home and hearth, Artemis of hunting, Athena of communal survival, and Aphrodite of wily desire, most deeply incarnate aspects of the sacred in women’s mysteries. Just as subgenres of women’s writing such as the detective “cozy” have not yet received their due of critical attention, so too the goddesses are demanding that more attention be paid to the feminine psyche. The Sleuth and the Goddess shows us that to read the works by renowned authors such as Marcia Muller, Sue Grafton, Diane Mott Davidson, Jacqueline Winspear, Lindsey Davis, and many more, is to summon the goddesses and be blessed by their vision, beauty, and call to danger.

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Posted in: archetypes, gender, goddesses