On Memoir, with Maureen Murdock

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Jan 23, 2017 5:01:10 PM

A guest post by Bonnie Bright, Ph.D.

Some of the best memoirs you can read are those that are reflective, those which are informed by dreams, myth, and synchronicities, maintains Maureen Murdock, a Jungian-oriented psychotherapist and the author of multiple memoirs and books about memoirs. In other words, there’s a depth psychological perspective that can facilitate, enhance, and deepen the telling of one’s story in a profound way.

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Posted in: Pacifica Events, creativity, images, dreams, writing

Mindfulness, Compassion, and Social Justice; An upcoming training at Pacifica

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Nov 9, 2016 3:01:23 PM

A guest post by student/alumnae Hala Khouri, M.A.

Graduating from Pacifica’s M.A. in Counseling Psychology Program in 2004 gave me a foundation that has nurtured my work since then. Today things have come full circle. This year, not only have I begun the Community Psychology, Liberation Psychology, and Ecopsychology Specialization of the Depth Psychology Program, but also the non-profit organization that I co-founded in 2007, Off the Mat, Into the World ®, will be offering a training intensive entitled, Mindfulness, Compassion, and Social Justice at Pacifica this December, 2016.

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Posted in: Pacifica Events, Social Justice, somatic bodywork, leadership

Dreaming the Earth: Earthing the Dream—Depth Psychology and Appreciative Nature Practices with Dr. Pat Katsky

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Mar 24, 2016 9:12:32 AM

A guest post by Bonnie Bright, Ph.D.

Dr. Pat Katsky is a Jungian Analyst and core faculty at Pacifica Graduate Institute, and she has been a therapist for thirty years. When Pat sat down with me in a recent interview, our conversation focused on the idea that some of the most psychologically healing experiences come from the natural world, a theme derived from an upcoming certificate program, “Dreaming the Earth: Earthing the Dream” starting April 15, 2016.

Pat mused on how in the last million or so years of history, humans have always needed nature and did not feel separate from it. But with the industrial revolution and the development of society as we know it, we have lost the connectedness. It has become something we do for vacation, she observes, then we return to jobs and daily life where nature is distant.

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Posted in: Pacifica Events, C.G. Jung, nature

Dezombifying Higher Education: A Depth Psychological Approach

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Mar 2, 2016 12:27:58 PM

A guest post by Frank McMillan

Nature is always right.  By repeated experiment, nature is now proven to be non-local.  According to quantum physicist Henry Stapp, non-locality is the most profound discovery of science.  Read that again.  Not simply an interesting finding or significant advance, but the most profound discovery in the history of science.  The reigning materialist paradigm that has dominated Western culture for three centuries is empirically dethroned as a complete explanation of reality.  More than seventy-five years after reductionism’s funeral in the labs of Bohr and Planck, Nature magazine printed its obituary last fall in an article entitled, “Quantum physics: Death by experiment for local realism.”  Wow.  To quote rock godfather Chuck Berry, “Roll over Beethoven and tell Tchaikovsky the news.”

Somebody refuses to listen, however.  I’m looking at you, Academia.

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Posted in: Pacifica Events, graduate school, vocation, Education

Your Story Accelerator: Bring Your Story to Life and Put Your Ideas into Action

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Mar 2, 2016 12:08:07 PM

How do you take your ideas and turn them into successful businesses and/or tangible projects?

If you have ever struggled with the “what, how and why” of your path in life, then we invite you to the upcoming workshop Your Story Accelerator: Bring Your Story to Life and Put Your Ideas into Action with Dr. Thyonne Gordon

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Posted in: Pacifica Events

Jung, Individuation, and Film

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Feb 3, 2016 2:21:36 PM

A guest post by Bonnie Bright, Ph.D.

Ever since I met Dr. Glen Slater in 2008, I have known him to be a particularly passionate and knowledgeable advocate of film. I often see his film reviews in Jungian and depth publications, and his background in clinical psychology and religious studies—along with his interest in technology and culture—make his commentary especially valuable.

In a recent interview, Glen and I sat down together for an intriguing depth discussion on Jung, individuation, and film.

To begin, Dr. Slater notes, while we can think of individuation as coming to one’s deep self or unique character, it’s also the place where one comes to contribute to the larger human story. The individuation process is both deeply personal but also transpersonal; both universal and archetypal. At any given time in a specific culture, individuation is about finding a deep relationship with those energies that are coming up from the collective psyche. Jung believed that “no one can individuate on a mountaintop,” Glen reminded me. Therefore, at the same time you are growing into your own genius, you are also finding where your own life resonates with what is emerging collectively.

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Posted in: Pacifica Events, C.G. Jung, film

Depth Psychological Approaches to Suffering

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Jan 27, 2016 9:31:49 PM

A guest post by Bonnie Bright, Ph.D.

Out of suffering have emerged the strongest souls; the most massive characters are seared with scars.” ― Kahlil Gibran

We are all intimately familiar with suffering. And, while we might wish it away when it is painfully present, it is a normal part of human life, Dr. Lionel Corbett, M.D., Jungian analyst and professor at Pacifica Graduate Institute reminded me when I recently sat down for a depth discussion with him on the topic.

Etymologically, the word “suffering” comes from two Latin roots: sub—meaning “under”—and ferre, meaning “to carry or bear,” as in “to bear a burden.” But suffering is not necessarily pathological, Lionel insists. The root of the word “suffer” is also the root of the English word “fertile,” so it is also related to the idea of bearing fruit. Psychologically, then, suffering can produce something; it’s not random or meaningless, nor merely something to get rid of. In reality, it can act as either a fertilizer or a poison. It can be harmful or it can be helpful, but we need a framework by which we can understand it.

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Posted in: The Psyche, Trauma, Pacifica Events, Psychology

Pacifica's Friday Evening Salon Series; A Complimentary Lecture

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Jan 19, 2016 1:57:49 PM

What are the Friday Evening Salon Series at Pacifica?

Throughout the year, Pacifica hosts prospective students on campus at The Pacifica Experience: A One-Day Introduction to Pacifica's Graduate Degree Programs. The Friday evening before each Pacifica Experience is reserved for public salons/lectures. These Salons are complimentary and open to the public.

We invite you to learn more about the meaning of the word salon and these wonderful lectures given by Pacifica Core Faculty members by listening to an interview with Dr. Jennifer Selig, who coincidentally will host the next upcoming salon this Friday, January 22nd from 7 - 8:30 p.m. titled The Right Address: How to Be Home When the Gods Come Calling.

Pacifica's Friday Evening Salon Series- An Interview with Dr. Jennifer Selig (mp3 ~ 4 minutes)

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Posted in: Pacifica Events

When the Gods Come Calling: Dr. Jennifer Selig on Finding One's Vocation

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Jan 12, 2016 1:36:59 PM

A guest post by Bonnie Bright, Ph.D.

What happens when the gods come calling, from a depth psychological perspective, and how can one be ready when it happens? These are questions that arose when I recently sat down with Dr. Jennifer Selig to discuss her upcoming Salon on January 22, 2016, at Pacifica’s Ladera Lane Campus: “The Right Address: How to Be Home When the Gods Come Calling.”

The title of Selig’s presentation is based on the double meaning of the word “address.” Not only can the word mean a physical “address” where you live or work— where you can typically be found—it’s verb form, while pronounced differently, signifies when someone calls you. “Calling” ties to the word “vocation,” which is based on the Latin vocatus, the past tense of vocare, “to call.” Vocation, from the early 15th century is defined as “spiritual calling.” Thus the word “vocation,” Selig notes, literally means to be called by the gods.

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Posted in: Pacifica Events, graduate school, vocation

Community and Ecological Fieldwork at Pacifica

Posted by Nikole Hollenitsch on Jan 6, 2016 2:53:03 PM

Every fall students in the the Community Psychology, Liberation Psychology, and Ecopsychology Specialization of the M.A./Ph.D. Depth Psychology Program gather together to present their Community and Ecological fieldwork research projects. The community and ecological fieldwork projects take place during the summer quarter of a student's first and second year in the program. Working with a faculty advisor, students choose an organization or group to work with, applying the insights and methodologies learned from this innovative course of study.

In mid-December of 2015 students, alumni, staff, faculty, and guests gathered together on the Ladera Lane Campus to view the poster and multi-media presentations created by the students of the Community Psychology, Liberation Psychology, and Ecopsychology Specialization.

To share this exquisite and powerful work of the students, and the communities they engage with, I have provided a list of each presentation. To learn more about the individual communities and fieldwork students work with download the list of presentations complete with full abstracts. 

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Posted in: Pacifica Events